Buy State Flags from Allstate FlagsBuy US flags from Five Star Flags
This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website

Swedish Speaking Population in the Baltic Countries

Last modified: 2004-07-31 by dov gutterman
Keywords: sweden | baltics | estonia | latvia | lithuania | scandinavian cross |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors




See also:


Situation

The Baltic countries used to have a Swedish speaking population early this century.
Jan Oskar Engene, 20 March 1996

This could be changed into Estonia, for neither Latvia nor Lithuania has never had a Swedish-speaking minority.
Mikael Parkvall, 27 July 2004


Proposal from Andersson

[First proposal for a flag for the Swedish speaking population
in the Baltic Countries]
by Jan Oskar Engene and Antonio Martins , 13 March 2000

The flag described by Andersson [and94] was proposed in 1992, but I am unsure whether this means there are still native Swedish speakers to be represented by the flag. Anyway, the flag is yellow-red-white, in proportions 16 : 25,6 (6-1-2-1-6 : 7,6-1-2-1-14). The colours come from the flags of the Nordic countries with closest ties to the area (Denmark, Finland and Sweden).
Jan Oskar Engene, 20 March 1996


Earlier Proposal

[Earlier proposal for a flag for the Swedish speaking population
in the Baltic Countries]
by Jan Oskar Engene and Antonio Martins , 13 March 2000

An earlier proposal was yellow-blue-white..
Jan Oskar Engene, 20 March 1996


Swedish Speaking Population in Estonia

[Earlier proposal for a flag for the Swedish speaking population
in the Baltic Countries]
by Mikael Parkvall, 27 July 2004

I just visited Estonia and met with some of the last remaining Swedish-speakers there. About 90% of them fled to Sweden during World War II, and most of those who never made it there have died during the past 60 years. There are probably a couple of dozen people living in Estonia today who were born in the country as native speakers of Swedish.
Anyway, during the first half of the 20th century, they had an organisation called "Svenska Odlingens Všnner" (=friends of Swedish culture), which still exists, but which has been based in Stockholm since the exodus. In a 1994 issue of their journal "Kustbon" ('the Coast dweller'), I found a photograph from 1924 depicting the flag of the association. I have no idea about the proportions of the flag, but for this sketch, I simply used those of the Estonian flag.
Since the society still exists, it could be that they still use the flag. That could easily be checked, but I have not made an effort to do so.
Mikael Parkvall, 27 July 2004